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Creative Map Solutions brings you the latest news in the GIS and mapping industry.
News feeds from Esri's Support Center.  Get the latest news on software updates and support from Esri, a world leader in geospatial software solutions.  Digital Data Services is a Silver Partner for Esri and offers a wide-variety of Esri based software and service solutions.

Creating a Custom Widget for Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS using the Report Class

Creating a Custom Widget for Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS using the Report Class | Support Services Blog

Esri is an equal opportunity employer (EOE) supporting diversity in the workforce.

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Original author: Artemis F.

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Esri Support Update: Using My Esri and the Request Case form

As always, Esri Support aims to make your time with us as simple and pleasant as possible. We are constantly reviewing the ways we interact with you and making improvements so that you receive the best possible support from our highly qualified team of analysts.

Starting on April 3rd, we are deprecating the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. email address as a method for creating an Esri Support ticket. Instead, we request that all Email and Chat cases be created through the Support website.A courtesy message may appear, stating that:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. is on a permanent vacation. For even better assistance, log into My Esri.”

Many customers already use the website to request new cases. Clicking the “Request Case” link on the Support site prompts you to sign in and then opens the Request Case web form. You can use this web form to describe the issue you are facing and the Esri software product you are using. By using the preformatted web form, rather than an email, we can quickly route your case to a specialized Support Analyst who can begin helping you right away.

Support cases can also be opened from the Support page on My Esri. This means that all Support resources will be in one place – the creation, tracking, and history of case work all occurs through My Esri. When a case is requested through the web form, the process of creating the case and routing it to the right analyst is optimized and streamlined, so customers will be connected faster than they would if emailing directly.

We’re very excited for the changes and updates being made to our Support website, and we’re looking forward to providing even better support as a result!

Melissa Q. & Joseph M. – Support Services

Original author: Joe

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A Survey: Your Esri Online Support Resources

Here at Esri Support, our goal is to provide you with a world-class support experience and ensure your success with the ArcGIS Platform–one element of this experience is online support.

Including this blog, Esri creates and maintains a vast network of online support resources, such as Support.Esri.com (which hosts a technical article knowledgebase, download links, product life cycle documentation, and more), Wiki.GIS.com, GeoNet forums (Esri Support actively uses the Esri Technical Support and ArcGIS Ideas places), the GIS Dictionary, among others.

For us to continue creating the best resources possible, we request your feedback through a brief survey: Esri Online Support Resources Survey.

Your responses will help us understand your online support preferences and how Esri can deliver the resources you need.

Thank you in advance, and we look forward to supporting you in the future!

Other Resources

Megan S. – Online Support Resources

Original author: Megan

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Support Services at the Esri Developer Summit: March 6 – 9, 2017

Are you going to the Esri Developer Summit this year? Perhaps you have some questions or need help and would like some special assistance from our Technical Support Analysts? Come see us at the GIS Technical Support Island (TSI) in the Esri Showcase.

The GIS Technical Support Island at Esri Dev Summit 2017

Esri Technical Support will have ten senior analysts available each day of the Developer Summit to assist customers with any technical questions or issues they may have with Esri products. These analysts are subject matter experts that span the many parts of the ArcGIS platform, so we should be able to help with most questions. However, if the problem is more complex, we will create a Support case and contact you later when you’re available. We will be stationed right next to several other Esri services, including Consulting, Training, and Cloud Management. If your questions lead us to a conversation about one of our other services, we will connect you with an expert in that area, as well.

In Support, each of the following teams and specialties will be represented:

Esri Support at Developer SummitOutside of the TSI, you can find Support Analysts throughout the summit, including at different sessions, demo theater presentations, and the Meet the Teams event.

Stop by and say hello!

Gregory L. – Online Support Resources

Original author: Greg Lehner

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JavaScript Debugging Tips Part II – Google Chrome and the Console Tab

This blog post is the 2nd in a series of JavaScript debugging tips and tricks to help you on your way. See JavaScript Debugging Tips Part I – Google Chrome and the Network Tab for our first segment.

The most enjoyable part of any programming assignment is right near the beginning when you sit down with a pile of tools and resources and start hammering away at raw clumps of code. The more difficult part comes when you attempt to launch the application, only to watch that tightly-written code unravel into multiple late nights staring at a computer screen. However, all is not lost, as we have an excellent recommendation for you, which is the subject of this blog: the Console tab inside your favorite browser’s Developer Tools.

If you’re feeling upset or emotional, the Console tab is the perfect choice for you. Maybe someone in your family is dealing with a difficult time, and could use some cheering up. Consider the Google Chrome Console tab (gluten free options are available). Users who like the Console tab might also enjoy the ArcGIS API for JavaScript.

I obviously do not understand homographs

I obviously do not understand homographs

As we wrote in Part I, accessing the Chrome Developer Tools is easily done using shortcut keys (Control + Shift + I) or by navigating to the top right of the browser, clicking on the hamburger and choosing “More Tools”, then “Developer tools”.

Once the Developer Tools are open (other Developer Tools are available in other browsers), there are several Tabs that become accessible to you. Here we will focus on the Console. If you want to open the Console tab in Chrome Developer Tools directly, use this keyboard shortcut: Control + Shift + J (the “J” stands for jocular). For more neat tips, please check out the official Google documentation about Chrome DevTools: Using the console.

The Console is used for two purposes: 1) to display logged information from an application’s JavaScript (usually during application development), and 2) to interrogate objects and execute JavaScript interactively. In this blog, we will look at both kinds of examples, and elaborate on some additional tips and tricks that we use in Technical Support.

The first thing we can do is to add some “console.log” statements inside our application. We will take a modified sample, hosted on GitHub, which can be found here: Sample Console Application. Feel free to follow along at home.

At lines 60-62, and again at line 66, we’ve added some of those “console.log” statements to display information about our Feature Layer. Our use case is that we are creating a web mapping application, and during our testing, we want to ensure that the data we are consuming from ArcGIS Online is the correct data to display on the map. To this end, we print out a few choice pieces of information about the Feature Layer: the title of the layer, and the URL of the layer. Since I do not know the syntax for the URL property, I use “URL” and “url” as seen below.

JavaScript console.log statements

JavaScript console.log statements

Here is a screenshot of the output of the “console.log” statements. We see the relevant information we were expecting. Also, please note that the output for “featureLayer.URL” is “undefined”. This is because items in the console are case sensitive. The valid property is “featureLater.url”, and invalid properties do not throw an error, and instead return an undefined result. This can be a tricky thing to trap, but later on in this blog we will look at some tips for dealing with this sort of issue.

JavaScript Console Output from console.log

JavaScript Console Output from console.log

With the Console still open, let’s try entering the same property values from the code:

featureLayer.title
featureLayer.URL
featureLayer.url

Notice that all of these properties now return an error, instead of an actual value (or even “undefined”). This is because the local variables are no longer in scope after the app is initialized, so even the “featureLayer” object cannot be recognized.  Here is a screenshot of the output of the new console statements.

JavaScript Console Output after App is loaded

JavaScript Console Output after App is loaded

If we had made “featureLayer” a global variable, we would then see “undefined” returned for the object in the Console (variable is known, but the details are still not accessible). The point is: only variables that are in scope can be interrogated in the Console. So can we use the Console interactively and type in property values? Let’s find out.

The next thing we can do to our sample app is to add a “debugger;” statement in the code. We will take another modified sample, hosted on GitHub, which can be found here: Sample Console Application 2. Feel free to follow along at home.

At line 60, we’ve added a “debugger;” statement to help display information about our Feature Layer in the Console.

JavaScript debugger statement

JavaScript debugger statement

How does this statement work? Click the link to run the application. Then, open the Developer Tools (Control + Shift + I or Control + Shift + J), and refresh the application. The application should pause, and you should see a “Paused in debugger” message at the top of the screen, and the “debugger” line highlighted in the Sources tab:

Paused in debugger 1

Paused in debugger 1

Now, with the application paused, we can go back to the Console tab, and try interrogating the featureLayer properties again. Here we see that we have proper scope to the variable and we can see the output:

Paused in debugger 2

Paused in debugger 2

Cool, right?

Let’s look at another option, similar to “debugger”. Back to the Sources tab, notice the line numbers to the left of the code. If we left-click on a line number, we can set a breakpoint, which will have the exact same effect as writing “debugger” in the code. Left-click on lines 56, 62, and 66 in the same application, then refresh the application.

Breakpoint 1

Breakpoint 1

The application pauses immediately at the first breakpoint. Now, we could go back to the Console tab and again inspect variables and properties to our heart’s content. Not only that, by clicking the curved arrow to the right of the Play button at the top of the screen, we can step through our application and watch the excitement as we see how the code executes step-by-step. Or, we can click the Play button at the top of the screen, and let the application run to completion, or to the next breakpoint.

Breakpoint 2

Breakpoint 2

And another Play button click brings us to the next breakpoint.

Breakpoint 3

Breakpoint 3

The point of this blog is to highlight the usefulness and functionality of the Console, but we do want to point out another usage of setting breakpoints here as well. Breakpoints allow the developer the ability to see the order in which asynchronous code executes, how functions are run and what parts get skipped or fail. For more information about debugging tips with JavaScript applications, here are a couple additional resources from the past several years:

In this installment, we learned how to access and use the Console tab inside Chrome Developer tools to reveal the properties and values of variables and objects in our JavaScript code. This information can greatly facilitate the debugging and coding of a web-based application. This concludes part two of a multi-part series on JavaScript Debugging Tips. Join us next time when we delve even deeper into some Developer Tools, and we all get raises. Happy debugging!

Noah S. and John G. – SDK Support Services

Original author: Noah

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