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WWTSD (What Would Tech Support Do?) Part II: Data-specific Issues

This blog post is part II of the WWTSD blog series from Esri Support Services. Click here to view the first part in the series: WWTSD (What Would Tech Support Do?) Part I.

Have you ever attempted to run a geoprocessing tool, only to have the tool fail? Perhaps your data fails to publish to ArcGIS Online or draws incorrectly on your map. Maybe you are running a geoprocessing tool only to have it fail with a generic error message. You are using the same workflow you use every day with the same settings and configuration, but you can’t seem to find another cause to the problem.

You may be dealing with a data-specific issue. There are a few basic troubleshooting steps that may provide a resolution to this, but it all starts with determining if the issue is truly data-specific.

Determining if an Issue Is Data-specific

A quick test to determine if an issue is data-specific is to bring your dataset into a blank map document, map frame, or web map (depending on the environment in which you are working). If the issue does not persist in a new map, then the issue may be specific to the map document. If you experience the same issue in a new map document, the source of the problem may be the data.

Another way to determine if an issue is data-specific is to run the same process with a different dataset similar to the one that you are using. For instance, if using a point shapefile that fails to import into your file geodatabase, run the process on a different point shapefile of a similar size. If the tool or process succeeds on the new dataset, then the issue may be data-specific. Luckily, there are tools available that can help to resolve some of these data-specific issues.

If you find that the problem or error is reproducible with multiple datasets, you may want to investigate some of our additional resources to determine the source of the issue. Feel free to check out more resources from the first post in the WWTSD series (linked above).

Possible Data-specific Issues and Their Solutions

A geometry error can be one potential source of a data-specific issue that has a quick fix. ArcGIS applications require that a feature’s geometry meets certain standards. Issues can occur if any features have null or incorrect geometry. In ArcMap and ArcGIS Pro, you can determine if your dataset has any geometry errors by running the Check Geometry tool, which generates a table that lists the geometry errors found in the data. If there are errors present in the resulting table, run the Repair Geometry tool to fix the geometry errors present in the data. It is recommended to make a copy of your data prior to running this tool, as the tool may delete records with geometry errors.

If your features appear in a different location on the globe than you would expect, your data may have an issue with your data’s projection. You can view the coordinate system of your data by navigating to the properties of the layer. If the data does not have a defined projection, you may need to use the Define Projection tool to assign the correct projection (see the tool documentation here for more information). If your data has been assigned a different projection than the other layers in your map, you may need to use the Project tool (here) to alter the coordinate system of your data. For more information about when to use the Define Projection tool versus the Project tool, take a look at the blog post found here. If you do not know what projection your data should be in, please see the technical article here for more information.

Data can become corrupt for various reasons, including incorrectly copying data or  experiencing connection issues to a network drive. These issues sometimes can be resolved by exporting the data into a different format or location, such as to a different feature class or to a .tif rather than to a .png raster file. If you are working in a file geodatabase, run the Recover File Geodatabase tool, which creates a new file geodatabase with repaired versions of feature classes that the tool identifies as potentially corrupt.

Considerations for Raster Datasets

Raster datasets have many parameters and properties and therefore, many sources of data-specific issues. The following by no means addresses all potential issues with raster datasets, but does address a couple common sources of data-specific issues for rasters and troubleshooting steps to address the issues.

Bit-depth is a characteristic of a raster that defines the possible cell values allowed for the dataset (for more information, click here). If the bit-depths of two or more rasters that you are running a geoprocessing operation on do not match, you may run into errors or issues. For instance, if you create a mosaic dataset containing rasters from multiple sources, you may want to confirm that the bit-depths of the rasters are the same. You can determine the bit-depth of a raster by navigating to the raster properties. If you must change the bit-depth of your raster, you can use the Copy Raster tool to manually set the necessary bit-depth and create a new output raster with those parameters.

When adding a raster dataset to a map document or creating a new one, you are given the option to build pyramids that control how the dataset is viewed at different scale levels. If you are unable to view your raster dataset at some scale levels, but not at other levels, the raster pyramids may have become corrupt. Exporting the raster into a different format or deleting and rebuilding pyramids may help resolve this issue. If you would like more information about deleting and rebuilding pyramids, click here.

Contact Esri Support

These steps can help to begin narrowing down potential causes to an issue, but they may not resolve every potential problem. If you need additional assistance with diagnosing or resolving an issue, feel free to contact Esri Support. We are happy to assist our customers resolve any technical issue they encounter. When contacting Esri Support, please be prepared to provide the following information so that an analyst can assist you as efficiently as possible.

Software version and license level Operating system Device, if using a mobile application Synopsis of the issue Detailed workflow Error message Test data

Krista M. – Desktop Support Analyst

Original author: kristam_ess

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The Esri Support Site Is Now in Spanish!

As part of our ongoing commitment to enhance the online support experience for our global user base, we are very pleased to announce the official launch of the Spanish language version of our award-winning Esri Support website.

Main Page in Spanish

Main Page in Spanish

http://support.esri.com/es/

Support site localization empowers customers to access important online support resources in their preferred language, such as:

Popular technical articles Product lifecycles Support downloads for all products in General Availability The Request Case web form The GIS Dictionary (to be completed by Q3 2017)


You can directly access the Spanish site through http://support.esri.com/es/, or by going to the English version of the site and selecting “Español” from the drop-down menu in the upper-right banner next to the Esri ID Sign In option.

Language Selection

Language Selection

As you navigate through the site, you may come across content that has not yet been translated. You can submit a translation request for this content by clicking the “Request Translation” button in the green banner at the top of the page or by filling out the site’s feedback web form in the page footer.

Request Translation

Request Translation

Our goal is to provide helpful and instructive content, and we strive to ensure this content maintains a high standard of quality. If you find any problems with the translated content or feel there are potential improvements, please use the “Translation Feedback” option (comentarios sobre la traducción) to send us your feedback.

Translation Feedback

Translation Feedback

Moving forward, we will translate the site into additional languages including Chinese, French, German, and Arabic.

Megan S. – Online Support Resources

Original author: Megan

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Support Services at the Esri User Conference: July 11-13, 2017

Esri Support Services will be at the 2017 Esri User Conference in San Diego (July 10-14), where we will offer GIS technical support help to answer any of your questions. Specialists in all areas of Esri software will be available to assist you.

Users attending the conference can visit our reception desk to meet with a support analyst who will be happy to discuss your concerns, issues, and questions. Appointments are not required, so feel free to stop by in between sessions or during lunch.

Just don’t forget to register first! You must be registered to gain access to the Tech Support Island, technical sessions, user stories, and demos of the latest Esri products.

Location:

In the back-center of the floor, behind Exhibit Hall B1 & B2 in the Customer Care pavilion; if you’re coming in from the main hall, look for Demo Theatre 09. Notice all the cool exhibits around us, as well!

Map of Esri User Conference 2017

Hours of Operation:

Tuesday, July 11th: 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM Wednesday, July 12th:  9:00 AM – 6:00 PM Thursday, July 13th: 9:00 AM – 1:30 PM

For more information about the User Conference, including session information, activity dates and times, and info on the Plenary, please download the Esri Events app (for Android and Apple), available now for free from the Google Play Store and iTunes Store.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Gregory L. – Online Support Resources

Original author: Greg Lehner

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Release of the Deprecated Features Plan for ArcGIS 10.5.1

This blog post provides the latest updates regarding deprecated features in the recent release of ArcGIS 10.5.1.

With each release, Esri assesses and adjusts the products and functionality supported in the ArcGIS Platform based on customer needs and technological trends. The purpose of the Deprecated Features for ArcGIS document is to provide as much advanced notice as possible regarding these changes.

For more information on Esri’s plans for deprecating features, refer to the following PDF document, Deprecated Features for ArcGIS 10.5.1 (this deprecation plan is also available in the following technical article from the Esri Support Knowledge Base). The documentation linked above provides additional information about each note below, in addition to recommendations of alternative workflows and applications. Information from previous releases (10.4 and 10.5) is also included in the link above.

Here are some of the major changes in ArcGIS 10.5.1:

ArcGIS 10.5.1 is the last release to support Visual Studio 2013 for the ArcObjects SDK. In the near future, the cluster functionality in the ArcGIS Server component of ArcGIS Enterprise will be deprecated. Instead, it is recommended to create separate ArcGIS Server sites where multiple clusters would have been used previously. ArcGIS Enterprise 10.5.1 will stop bundling the portalpy module in favor of the ArcGIS API for Python. No further development is planned for this module. ArcGIS 10.5.1 will be the last release to support the PostgreSQL 9.3.x series of releases, DB2 versions 9.7 and 10.1, and the ST_Raster data type for Oracle, SQL Server, and PostgreSQL. ArcGIS 10.5.1 is the last release to support anything other than the Data Store product as a data store for a Hosting Server.

Note: The deprecation of cluster functionality does not affect the ability to create multi-machine sites. ArcGIS Server sites with multiple machines continue to be fully supported.

Gregory L. – Online Support Resources

This entry was posted in Announcements, ArcGIS Desktop, ArcGIS Enterprise, export, SDK and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
Original author: Greg Lehner

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Three Methods for Clipping a Network Dataset in ArcGIS Desktop

Imagine this: you’ve been assigned a project where you must find the drive times (at 5 minutes, 10 minutes, and 30 minutes) for 100 different customers and the best routes to deliver supplies to all customers. On top of that, you’ll need to do it for many different datasets. The result of each analysis, along with the underlying data used to produce those results, must be sent to the client.

ArcGIS Network Analyst is the best option, but you’ll need your own network dataset. So, you reach out to a colleague or friend. They’d be happy to give you a network dataset, but it contains data for a much larger area than needed. While it may work for your analyses, you can’t send the client the whole dataset.

A network dataset containing turn features, sign features, and/or traffic data can be difficult to clip. Using a regular Clip operation on the streets can break connectivity between the streets, as well as break the link between the network edges and the turns, signs, and traffic data.

So, the question is how can you clip the network dataset to a manageable size and keep all the connectivity between the streets, turns, signs, and even the traffic data?

There are a few ways to accomplish this, as outlined in this post.

Using Extracted Data from the Distributed Geodatabase Toolbar in ArcMap:

From the Distributed Geodatabase toolbar, select Extract Data.  In the Extract Data Wizard, check the box to ‘Show advanced options for overriding data extraction defaults when I click Next’.
Click Next. Choose the extent of the data to extract to a new geodatabase (when using an extent smaller than the full extent of the network dataset, the network dataset will be clipped to that extent during the extraction). Choose the feature classes to extract. By default, all feature classes in the map are checked, and the network dataset is one of those layers. Click Next > Finish.

Using the Consolidate Layer Geoprocessing Tool in ArcMap or ArcGIS Pro:

In the Data Management toolbox, select Package toolset > Consolidate Layer. Choose the input layers and the output folder. Choosing the network dataset layer (for example, Streets_ND) brings all source layers with it. Choose the output format. Choose the extent of the data to extract to a new geodatabase (when using an extent smaller than the full extent of the network dataset, the network dataset will be clipped to that extent during the extraction).

Create Mobile Map Packaging Tool in ArcGIS Pro:

Note: This is the best option if you plan to use routing in Navigator for ArcGIS.

Choose the input map(s) and the output location. Optional: Choose an input locator. If you want to use data in Navigator for ArcGIS, you must use an input locator other than the World Geocoding Service or the default XY locator. Choose the appropriate extent (when using an extent smaller than the full extent of the network dataset, the network dataset will be clipped to that extent during the extraction). Check the box to Clip Features.

With all methods above, your data will still allow routing and other network analysis, but will now be a much more manageable size for sharing with others.

Rachel A. – Desktop Support Analyst

Original author: Rachel

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